Nacon Revolution X Pro Review – A customisable pro Xbox controller that’s a lot cheaper vs the Razer Wolverine V2 Chroma

Sharing is caring!

Nacon Revolution X Pro Review Rating

Summary

The Nacon Revolution X Pro is an excellent controller for any serious gamer that wants to be able to customise the performance of their controller. Even though it is expensive it seems to offer better value for money than the Razer Wolverine V2 Chroma

Overall
80%
80%
  • Overall - 80%
    80%

Pros

  • Good level of physical customisation
  • Excellent options for the profile settings
  • Better balance of price/features vs competing brands

Cons

  • 4-way D-pad rather than circle
  • Many gamers will prefer a wireless option

I have reviewed a few Nacon peripherals in the past year, with the Nacon MG-X being my most recent review and previously the Nacon Pro Compact.

They are now back with a new Xbox controller, this one takes most of the excellent features of the Nacon Pro Compact and ramps things up to the next level. You have the same sort of software customisations, but this new controller has additional programable buttons and numerous physical adjustments, allowing you to customise the controller to your liking.

Technical Specification

  • Connection: Detachable USB-C/USB cable
  • Wireless: No
  • Cable: 300cm
  • Headset Jack: Yes
  • Surround Sound: Dolby Atmos for Headphones
  • Joystick position: Asymmetric
  • Programs: Yes
  • Programmable buttons: Yes
  • Compatibility: Windows/XBOX Series/XBOX ONE

Features

The tech spec doesn’t do this controller justice. This isn’t some generic controller with a premium build. There is an extensive level of features and customisations, including:

  • Physical customisation
    • Swappable shafts going from 30-degree to 40-degree amplitude
    • Concave or convex-shaped buttons
    • Adjustable weighted handles allowing you to add 10g, 14g, or 16g of weight per handle
  • Customisable Profiles managed via app allowing:
    • Custom trigger sensitivity
    • Custom Left/Right switch response curve
    • Remappable buttons
    • Equaliser settings

Set-Up

The controller works out of the box like any other, plug it in, and you can start gaming.

However, you will need the Revolution-X app to map the customisations to the controller. The various options available are almost identical to the Nacon Pro Compact. You can adjust trigger sensitivity, button mapping and the response curve of the analogue sticks. However, you now have 4 additional rear buttons you can customise, and you have some RGB elements you can also customise. This also has multiple profiles allowing you to customise a profile depending on the game you play, allowing you to switch during gaming without having to go back into the app and adjust everything.

In Use

I don’t really game as much as I used to, but this review has coincided with the launch of Far Cry 6, so I have used this as a good excuse to play the game over the past week.

The controller feels comfortable in hand, it is quite lightweight without the added weights, and I wouldn’t say it feels particularly heavy with the maximum additional weight of 32g.

If you want a light controller, this has a clear advantage. The Razer controllers weigh 274g or 270g for the Chroma, the Xbox Elite 2 weighs 345g (due to the battery), whereas this is 266g at its maximum weight, going down to 234g without the additional weights.

Microsoft has switched to a circular D-pad, while this uses the more traditional 4-way option. I have no strong feelings about it, but it could be something that will irk some gamers.

The controller also uses larger than standard buttons with thick printed labelling making the buttons look a bit like they were designed for a child. However, they work well, the larger design seems to make the thumb travel between the buttons smaller, allowing for quicker response.

The profile customisations are good. I didn’t really set up different profiles for different games, I basically just customised it to my liking and used the same profile for all gamers.

The 4 programable shortcut buttons sit to the left and right of the controller, with two of them of the textured grip.  This then means your fingers naturally rest on these buttons. I’d say this is a better design than the Razer Wolverine V2 Chroma, which has sticky-out buttons in the centre part of the controller. The Razer also has an additional 2 shoulder buttons compared to this.

The controller also supports Dolby Atmos audio and you get a Dolby Atmos licence with it which is worth about £12.

Overall, I am probably not enough of a serious gamer to make the most of this controller, but it is very impressive. The physical adjustments were the thing I thought I’d appreciate more, but I can’t say that the weight difference made that much difference to me. However, dialling in the various profile settings to my liking made quite a bit of difference compared to using a standard controller.

Price and Alternative Options

The Nacon Revolution X Pro has an RRP of £99.99, which is a lot of money, but I think this offers a good balance of price and features compared to the other options on the market.

The Nacon Pro Compact is just £44.99, which has some of the features of this controller with personalised controls via the Pro Compact app available on Microsoft Store.

The Razer Wolverine V2 Controller is priced at £75 currently but has an RRP of £100. This has precise actuation of Mecha-Tactile Action Buttons and an ultra-responsive D-Pad. Plus, you have Hair Trigger Mode on your side with stop-switches for rapid firing and inevitable victories. You can then customise the buttons just like the Nacon. It lacks the physical customisation the Nacon has.

The newer Razer Wolverine V2 Chroma is around £170, adding 4-back buttons, RGB, customisable thumbsticks and a circular back button.

The PowerA Fusion Pro Wired Controller is £80, which has a mappable Pro Pack, four removable paddles, three-way trigger locks and swappable parts.

The Official Xbox Elite Wireless Controller Series 2 is a massive £159.99 or the standard Xbox Wireless Controller is £55 or £65 with a dongle for Windows.

Overall

Casual gamers will immediately dismiss the Nacon Revolution X Pro due to its high price and wired connectivity. This controller is not designed for them.

Gamers that obsess about their performance and/or are very particular how the controller feels and responds are going to be the ones that appreciate it.

I’ll admit, I am in the former category, I don’t do competitive gaming and my busy work schedule often means I often play games in easy allowing me to enjoy the experience rather than grind it out. However, I can appreciate the level of customisation on offer here,

There seems to be just three competing 3rd party controllers that are officially licenced that can compete with the Nacon Revolution X Pro. The Nacon has superior physical customisation compared to the cheaper Razer and it is considerably cheaper than the Chroma. While it may lack some of the physical customisations of the PowerA, the Nacon makes up for with the extensive profile options that are available via the app. I have not used the other three controllers so I can’t say how they perform in comparison, but the Nacon Revolution X Pro does seem to be the standout solution and the best option for series Xbox gamers.

Last update on 2021-09-19 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API

Leave a comment

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.