Thermaltake is determined to make a case for every budget and requirement, I have reviewed some of their more affordable options, and some of their largest and more expensive choices.

The Thermaltake Commander series builds upon this by offering six new options. Functionally they are all the same case, but with different mesh front panels that enable efficient airflow and showcase the illumination behind them.

At the time of writing, there is only Scan listing most of the cases, this includes six black cases, and then two in white. All the black options cost £99.98 while the white variant is £113.99.

These sit in the mid-ground of pricing for mid-towed cases.  Notable options around the same price are the Fractal Design Define R5 and the NZXT H500i, so it is a competitive price point.

Features

For me, the standout feature of these cases is the 2x200mm fans installed in the front and they are ARGB which are then controlled via a built-in hub. 200mm fans can shift more air at a lower noise than their 120mm counterparts (which the NZXT uses). ARGB is also a big selling point for many, if you have a motherboard with a 5V addressable header, you can control the lighting via software. This includes ASUS Aura Sync, GIGABYTE RGB Fusion, MSI Mystic Light Sync and ASRock Polychrome.

If you don’t have access to an addressable header, then you can still control the lighting via the RGB button on the I/O panel at the top of the case. There are various options include wave, flow, RGB, Radar, breath and single colour

Thermaltake also includes several other features traditionally found on more expensive options. The tempered glass side panel is ubiquitous among cases nowadays, but Thermaltake also includes a GPU support bracket for vertical placement of your graphics card. The bracket is located on the top of a fix in PSU shroud, which itself, has a window at the top to show off any RGB on your PSU.

The Commander C36 TG ARGB has outstanding expandability with support for a tower CPU cooler with maximum height 180mm, a dual expansion slot VGA of up to 310mm in length with reservoir, and a power supply with length of up to 200mm.

The case can house up to two 200mm, two 140mm or three 120mm front fans, up to two 140mm fans on top to allow users to build a complete high-end system.

Radiator support is also excellent for a case of this price. The front and top can handle up to 280mm with 120mm on the rear.

This doesn’t use traditional hard drive bays, but instead uses hidden mounts and can accommodate more than most people need with 3 x 3.5“ or 2.5” (HDD Bracket) and 2 x 2.5” (HDD Bracket). Most of these are located on the hidden side of the case, but the third 3.5” mount is on the base of the case just behind the PSU.

Design and Build Quality

With the model I was sent, the front panel has three angular V-shaped mesh sections with a honeycomb pattern sitting behind that, and the two large ARGB fans clearly visible through it

The angular design of the front panel is very PC gamer, so will no doubt appeal to a lot of buyers. The ARGB fans that Thermaltake has started using feel lees in your face than the RGB options used on older cases like the Level 20. With the fans sitting behind mesh panelling, it is a relatively subtle glow of colours, and I feel like this is less over the top than some other options.

Only one side of the case uses tempered glass while the other is a solid black panel. Due to my questionable cable management skills, I actually prefer this design.

The overall build quality and design is good enough and comparable to other cases at this price point.

Build & Performance

Probably because I have reviewed so many of the massive Thermaltake cases, building in this felt a touch cramped. The mid-sized case only just accommodates an ATX motherboard and attaching the 8-pin EPS12V power to CPU was a little fiddly, especially as I was not using a modular PSU so couldn’t pre-attach it.

Beyond that, it was quite a simple build, the PSU shroud is fixed in place so you slide the PSU through where it usually mounts, and then fix a mounting plate over it.

I actually found cable management to be quite easy in this, perhaps because I kept things simple and most of the cables were pre-routed and clipped down. The solid side panel and PSU shroud also meant I could tuck everything away without it being visible at all.

When I reviewed the Smart RGB PSU by Thermaltake I said the RGB wasn’t particularly visible with a PSU shroud, however, with this case, there is a cut out just where the RGB fan is, so dependant on your GPU placement the LEDs are nicely visible here.

Overall

This is another good case from Thermaltake, I particularly like the 200mm fans, and the ARGB effect isn’t quite as in your face as some of the other cases I have reviewed.

There is not a massive amount of difference between this and the Level 20 MT ARGB, it is mostly aesthetics. This also has the 200mm fans vs 3x120mm and it also has the vertical GPU bracket option. These tweaks will set you back an additional £15, for many, this will be worth it just for the GPU mounting option, as this has become a popular choice among with gamers.