Author: Richard Cartwright

What does the new iPad really bring to the UK? Not LTE

Apple has announced its third generation iPad, the world went wild,  and now its back ordered.While the retina display has been widely hailed as the best tablet screen ever and the voice dictation, faster processor, plus new camera and iPhoto are real lures for an upgrade, if the prospect of LTE speed is what gets you ready to hand over your hard earned quid over to Apple think again. The LTE standard being adopted by the United Kingdom and Europe is not compatible wit the latest iPad. The first indication that LTE compatibility might be a problem  was during the Apple iPad announcement when it was revealed that there would be separate LTE iPads for American wireless carriers ATT and Verizon. ATT uses the 700Mhz and 2100Mhz bands and Verizon uses the 700 Mhz band. At this point, the UK telecommunications body Ofcom has not even auctioned LTE spectra yet and when it does, it won’t be either 700Mhz or 2100 Mhz. Of course, the Apple site makes that very clear, just go down to the bottom of the page at footnote 2 ” Data plan is sold separately. 4G LTE coverage is not available in all areas and varies by carrier. See your carrier for details”  The question of purchasing the new iPad should not just turn on LTE. The display is quite the thing, and the voice dictation looks like it will be a winner. Those features...

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Apple to Phase out Mac OSX

The new version of OSX that Apple recently released to developer, Mountain Lion,  has many new additions to the operating system. One thing it wion’t have is “Mac” as part of its name. According to Niliay Patel at the Verge, the official name of the release is OSX Mountain Lion. This move by Apple is a boost to those who subscribe to the idea that Apple is moving to one OS to rule them all, a blending of iOS and OSX that would allow for developers to write for one OS that spanned across smartphones, tablets, and lorries, I mean Mac desktops and laptops. While its unlikely that  Final Cut Pro will be running on an iPhone any version soon, it is by no means out of the realm of possibility that Final Cut Express won’t show up on the iPhone or more likely the iPad. Apple and its developers would gain some great economies by being able to develop in a unified environment. (Not that Apple needs any more advantages) A developer could effectively scale a program limited only by the capabilities of the hardware. Of course it does raise the pricing question,  bu considering the past practice I would think users would expect tp pay for every platform. A smart developer might offer an option that if you purchased the MacBook version, you had the iPhone and iPad apps thrown in for free. Oh wait, Apple and...

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Is this Apple’s plan for the textbook market?

Looking at Apple’s education announcement and the later statements by McGraw-Hill CEO Terry McGraw that; 1.  school boards would have to pay the $14.99USD “pilot pricing” per year per student and. 2.a paper text book costs $75.00USD per book and is replaced once every five years or so, and that Mr. McGraw expected to make money on “volume”, I had to wonder how Apple was going to knife the publishers? There has to be a plan to take out the publishers, because it is in Apple’s corporate DNA to screw the old school content providers. They almost have to, because the scheme as presented has absolutely no cost savings to cash strapped American school boards, and the prospect of a huge investment into the Apple ecosystem.Here is how I think it is going to play out.  In the US, publicly funded schools are generally overseen by the various states and each county and or city has its own school board that is for the most part funded by local taxes. Apple is going to point out to the state oversight school boards (if the states don’t figure it out on their own) that they can create their OWN textbooks using their own state university resources (ie graduate students) Essentially, once the primary texts are done, its just  a mater of updating and revisions.  For example, the American State of...

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Apple announces iBook 2 for US schools. Will the UK follow?

Thursday, Apple announced the release of iBooks2  and iBooks Author; new and free textbook reading  and authoring tools.  Apple also revealed a partnership to create and sell low cost interactive textbooks with the big three textbook publishers that account for 90% of the sales of textbooks to the first 13 grades of American schools, known as K-12. Finally, Apple expanded its iTunes U uni lecture series to the K-12 market.   Missing from the announcement was any price break for the beleaguered American school system and that it was a closed Apple hardware only system. Also absent was the fact that if you create content with iBooks Author, you have to sell it in the Apple store. Apple has not indicated any similar arrangement with UK publishers, but as I mention here, that may not be Apple’s scheme in any case. Stay tuned, there may be a bit more to this story as it plays...

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Roku Players set to land in United Kingdom and Ireland in late January

Wanting to hook up Netflix to the new flatscreen? Well the job just got easier with the announcement of the debut of the Roku box in the UK and Ireland today.  Currently available for preorder only through Amazon, the little box that has allowed so many in the US to cut  cable or satellite bills by streaming content over the internet, can now spread its lie in inducing goodness here as well. Roku will initially offer two models from its current lineup, the Roku LT at £49.99  and the upmarket Roku 2 XS at £99.99. Other than price, the main difference between the two products is that the LT does not have external storage options and is limited to 720p. Nor is it Bluetooth capable. The Roku 2 XS supports, true HD 1080p, has a slot for an miniSD card, Bluetooth, and both Ethernet and USB ports.The XS also has an enhanced game controller to get your Angry Birds on.  Because you don’t have enough addictive time wasters in your life, each set also has a free copy of Angry Birds. Both devices support b/g/n Wi-Fi. Anyone familiar with the history of Roku would not be surprised by the introduction of the tiny player  following hot on the heels of the Netflix rollout. Roku started out as a division of Netflix, tasked to create a simple and easy to use device to stream video content over...

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